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Kentucky Town, TX

10 May

At first I thought the upcoming road was just that, a road called Kentucky Town. The sign didn’t include a population like most do as you enter into the city/town/village limits. And I’ve been through towns where populations are as low as 100-something. But as I passed by, a big church sign is situated on the corner of the 11 and Kentucky Town Road. I turned around and went back.

Turning left off the highway about 18 miles south of Sherman TX, my imagination ran wild with images of an old town square, an abandoned jail cell situated in the town park, and a junk store with all the goodies from old times. Nothing like that was there. In fact, all that I found was this church and some houses across the road. The church is a large structure probably attracting a great many who are scattered across the wide openness of the area. There is this old bell and a historical marker with these words:

When first settled in 1830s was known as Annaliza. Renamed by Kentucky emigrants in 1858. Unique layout gave town protection against Indian attacks. On freight and stage routes. “Sacred Harp,” a robust frontier gospel style of singing and composition, began here. During Civil War was Quantrill gang rendezvous.

According to a few Texas websites, Kentucky Town was quite the thriving place at one time. Quintrill and his gang have their own story I’m sure and it does add a bit of colorful paint to the Texas canvas. But it was where they laid train tracks and routed the rail that put Kentucky Town with what it is today.

Big story. Little town.

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7 Comments

Posted by on May 10, 2010 in Churches, Photography, small towns, Texas

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

7 responses to “Kentucky Town, TX

  1. D. Green

    June 13, 2011 at 7:26 pm

    Anna Eliza was the daughter of Dr. Josiah Hiestand who was responsible for platting the town.

     
  2. Patsy Ruth Neal

    July 6, 2012 at 1:10 am

    I was raised in Kentuckytown . Born in 1947 the 11th child in a family of 12 I enjoyed my childhood there and knew I was part of something special. As I have grown older I have come to feel even more proud of the town’s history though very few people actually know much about it. A book, “Kentuckytown and It’s Baptist Church” written by Joe W. Chumbley in 1975 tells the history as most ky residents would remember it.Chumbley’ style of writing reflects the communitys dialect
    rightly so since he lived in the nearby town of Tom Bean in his early years. The book is based on the actual minutes of the church records dating back to the 1850’s. The bell belonged to a two room school house which was originally the church. When the school consoladated with Whitewright, the two buildings were joined together to create a larger church meeting house. I was among the last class to attend the two room school before being sent to school at Whitewright where I graduated in 1965.
    The book is in the Sherman Library. If you are interested in the town’s history, it’s the book to read.

    Patsy Ruth Neal

     
  3. wildstorm

    September 23, 2012 at 3:38 pm

    Great information, Patsy. Thank you so much for your comment.

     
  4. MJ Burton

    February 23, 2013 at 6:45 am

    Very interesting information, the Kentuckytown cemetery is located at the end of Ole Vittitoe Road, which is a residential road with a half dozen homes on it. If you are a history buff, then this small town is a steroid for your brain and imagination….scenery is almost unscathed and awe inspiring.

     
  5. wildstorm

    March 3, 2013 at 3:17 pm

    MJ, thank you for sharing your comment. I’ve wanted to stop there and visit with people who live there and get stories of it all. Beautiful area indeed.

     
  6. Freda Gibson

    January 25, 2017 at 6:02 pm

    Patsy Ruth Neal my grandfather married Bessie Lee Reynolds who lived in that area. I know there are still Reynolds there. Do you know any of them? My #903-767-7152, My email is mrsclean2060@sbcglobal.net any help is appreciated. Thanks,
    Freda Gibson

     
  7. wildstorm

    March 17, 2017 at 12:44 am

    Freda, I do not know those names. I am a transplant from California so I am still getting to know everyone. Thank you for the visit. I’ll leave this comment up for maybe someone might see it and reply.

     

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